SIDS is defined as “a sudden and unexpected death of an infant or young child, in which a thorough postmortem examination, and examination of the death scene, fails to demonstrate an adequate cause for death.” It is the single most frequent cause of infant death, accounting for about 150 deaths a year in Canada roughly 1 in 2000 live births and 3ooo deaths a year in the United States.

The stories are basically the same. Usually, a perfectly healthy, happy baby is settled down for a little nap or bedtime without any hint of anything amiss. When the mother goes in to wake up infant, she finds her child dead, blue and very still. Resuscitation is attempted, the ambulance called, and the baby arrives in an Emergency Department, where doctors try to resurrect the infant. The tiny hope of life that was the baby has been extinguished, and no one knows why.

Three quarters of the deaths occur in infants between the ages of two and four months, and it is rare after ten months of age. SIDS is commoner in male than in female babies, in smaller babies and premature ones, in sibling of previous victims of SIDS, in infants born to mothers who smoked during their pregnancy, in families where cigarette smoke is found regularly in the home, in the offspring of mothers who are very young, and in Native Americans. The deaths most often occur during the cold season in temperature climates. One half of the infants have some sort of mild upper respiratory infection prior to death.

Significantly, SIDS occurs more frequently when infants are allowed to sleep in a prone or face down position and when infants are more heavily wrapped. The combination of viral illness, heavy wrapping, and the prone position increases the risk for SIDS tremendously. In New Zealand, where SIDS rates are inexplicably high, a campaign to educate mothers has resulted in a dramatic decrease in incidence almost 50 percent over two years.

SIDS may be sleep disorder, through the evidence is not conclusive. Most SIDS deaths occur either during the night or during nap time, suggesting a relationship with sleep. Parents who happened to be in the same room with their child at the time of death most often report that no crying was heard, raising the suspicion that the death may have occurred during sleep. We know that the ability to react to low oxygen levels in the blood is reduced during REM sleep, and the percentage of REM sleep is much higher in young infants that it is in older children and adults. We also know that sleep disturbances, including apnea, are commoner in premature infants who again have a greater amount of REM sleep. All these observations suggest that SIDS may be related to sleep.

When SIDS infants are examined carefully at autopsy, the only consistent finding is that of small groupings of fresh bruises on microscopic areas of blessing on the lungs and the lining of the heart. Exactly the same pattern is seen n infants who die in choking spells or from obstruction of their upper airway, suggesting that the final mechanism for SIDS may be the same.

However, conclusive evidence linking SIDS to a sleep disorder is lacking. Much of the clinically observed information doesn’t fit this hypothesis, and the suspicious is that the phenomenon is much more complicated that a simple sleep disorder, though it may occur during sleep.

Insomnia can be affected by many of factors like stress, depression, sickness, drug, and some bad lifestyle. One of the root cause is the partner who sleep beside you was the reason that make you insomnia.



Source by Babies & Kiddos

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